Jerusalem Homeopathy Clinic

Vera Resnick-Weisz, DHom Med (Lic), IHM. Classical Homoeopathy. Local and online homoeopathic treatment available

Of medicine, elephants and cherry trees

elephant cherry tree— Why do elephants paint their toenails red?
— So they can hide in cherry trees.
— Really? Sounds crazy to me…
— Ever seen an elephant in a cherry tree?
— No-o-o…
— Well that just proves how well it works…

What do elephants in cherry trees have to do with anything? Read on, and all will be revealed…

I broke my foot.  This was a while ago, and was not a major tragedy.  However, the process was  most enlightening.

For four weeks I was condemned to a plaster cast.   It was heavy.  That’s public health for you… you have to pay more money for them to lighten your load and give you a cast that is technologically more advanced…It was unwieldy. It was uncomfortable.  It caused skin problems and I was told not to walk on it.  And blithely informed of the risks of thrombosis if I didn’t move my leg.

The doctor gave me a cast which went up to the knee.

— It’s my foot, I remonstrated. It’s that small bone, over there…
— A cast around the jaw will help your healing, he replied, shall I go ahead? You won’t be able to talk for a while…
— No, no, I answered after having been thus firmly reminded of my place as a patient, up to the knee is fine, just fine…

Of course it didn’t happen quite like that (although the bit about the cast up to the knee was accurate…).
But plaster casts? In the 21st century?  As I manoeuvred carefully around the house on crutches for the following weeks, lugging this heavy plaster-bound appendage around with me, living in constant terror of losing my one-legged balance, I found myself wondering whether anything had changed since medieval times.

For the most part, I find that modern medicine has come up with amazing solutions in this age of technology, advanced materials development, and professional out-of-the-box thinking. In any area where immediate results are required otherwise the patient dies, bleeds to death, or any other condition where death is imminently present, modern medicine literally performs miracles, up to and including bringing patients back from the dead.

But in chronic conditions? Here the situation reminds me somewhat of insurance scams. Take out insurance just in case your phone gets stolen on a foreign beach, just in case your cat goes walkabout, just in case your docile poodle for some unknown reason turns violent and bites an innocent toddler. Take these medications just in case you get a heart attack. Just in case you get (heaven forfend) the flu. Just in case you stumble upon an infected needle in your dining room and get Hepatitis B.

Any poor unmedically educated soul asking questions will be drowned in a flood of statistics and reports from “studies which prove that…” Any mention of the fact that the studies are for the most part sponsored by the drug companies is conveniently omitted. Leading to the following conversations and their ilk:

A brief exchange about the flu vaccine:
— Of course the flu vaccine works, everyone says it does. I didn’t get flu once.
— Really?
— Yes, I did have that reaction to the flu vaccine but it went after three weeks…

A defence of statins:
— Of course the statins are working, my cholesterol is down! And I didn’t have a heart attack!
— Were you supposed to have a heart attack?
— The doctor said I would have one if I didn’t take statins. So now I’m more relaxed about the whole thing. The possibility was making me very nervous. My blood pressure was going up.

A short discussion on blood pressure medications:
— Of course I have to take blood pressure medications. It’s wonderful, my blood pressure is completely normal.
— It’s not normal, it’s constantly controlled by drugs.
— That’s the same thing isn’t it? That’s what my doctor says.

Anyone found any elephants in cherry trees lately?  I rest my crutch-weary case…

 

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